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Road Signs
Road Signs Level crossing signals Road markings Information signs
Warning signs Tram signs & signals Traffic calming Traffic Signals
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Signals by Authorised Persons     

11- Road markings

Along the road


Centre line on a single carriageway road Lane line separating traffic travelling in the same direction (single or dual carriageway road) Hazard warning line (replaces a centre line or a lane line). An upright sign may indicate the nature of the hazard,such as a bend. The marking is used also on the approach to a junction


Diagonal white lines (hatched markings) bounded by broken lines may be used in the centre of the road to separate opposing flows of traffic. They are often provided at junctions to protect traffic turning right. They may also be used on the approach to a central traffic island or the start of a dual carriageway. Hatched markings with a single, broken boundary line may be used at the edge of the road or next to the central reservation of a dual carriageway: the diagonal lines always slope towards the direction of travel. You should not enter any hatched area bounded by a broken line unless it is safe to do so. Road markings along the part of the carriageway where traffic passes in the same direction on either side of the chevron marking. Vehicles should not enter the area unless safe to do so. This marking is likely to be found in one-way streets with central islands and where an exit lane leaves at a junction Part of the carriageway where traffic passes in the same direction on either side of the chevron marking. The continuous boundary line means that vehicles must not enter the area except in an emergency. This marking is used where slip roads leave and join motorways and many dual carriageway roads. It is also used for segregated left-turn lanes at roundabouts. Arrow indicating the direction in which to pass hatched markings and double white lines, or the route that high vehicles should take under a low arch bridge (may be reversed) Reduction in the number of lanes, or area not available to traffic. Vehicles must not cross the continuous white line except in an emergency. Used on the right-hand side of a motorway, dual carriageway road or slip road road markings

Part of the carriageway where traffic passes in the same direction on either side of the chevron marking. Vehicles should not enter the area unless safe to do so. This marking is likely to be found in one-way streets with central islands and where an exit lane leaves at a junction Part of the carriageway where traffic passes in the same direction on either side of the chevron marking. The continuous boundary line means that vehicles must not enter the area except in an emergency. This marking is used where slip roads leave and join motorways and many dual carriageway roads. It is also used for segregated left-turn lanes at roundabouts

Reduction in the number of lanes, or area not available to traffic. Vehicles must not cross the continuous white line except in an emergency. Used on the right-hand side of a motorway, dual carriageway road or slip road Arrow indicating the direction in which to pass hatched markings and double white lines, or the route that high vehicles should take under a low arch bridge (may be reversed)

Double white lines

Double white lines These are used to prevent overtaking where visibility is restricted,and to separate opposing traffic flows on steep hills with climbing lanes. Double continuous lines are also sometimes used on other single carriageway roads that have two lanes in at least one direction. Viewed in the direction of travel, if the line closest to you is continuous, you must not cross or straddle it (except to turn into or out of a side road or property, avoid a stationary vehicle blocking the lane, or overtake a pedal cycle, horse or road works vehicle moving at not more than 10 mph). Where the line closest to you is broken, you may cross the lines to overtake if it is safe to do so. Stopping is prohibited on any length of road that has double white lines, even if the line on that side of the road is broken. The exceptions are stopping to pick up or set down passengers, or to load or unload. In these circumstances, you should park off the main carriageway wherever possible.






Along the edge of the road


Edge of carriageway, other than at junctions, exits from private drives and lay-bys. Used on the left-hand side of the road and alongside the central reservation of dual carriageway roads Alternative edge of carriageway marking, with raised ribs to provide audible and tactile warnings when the line is being crossed. They are used on motorways and other roads with hard shoulders or hard marginal strips


Edge of main carriageway at a junction (particularly where a slip road leaves or joins), at an exit from a private drive or at a lay-by. Also used to divide the main carriageway from a traffic lane that leaves the main carriageway at a junction ahead (lane drop) Edge of main carriageway at a junction or at an exit from a private drive. Used in conjunction with "give way" markings on the side road



At junctions













Where stationary traffic would be likely to block a junction, a yellow box may be marked on the road, covering all or part of the junction. You must not enter the box if your exit is not clear. If turning right at the junction, you may enter the box (behind other right-turning vehicles, if any) to wait for a gap in the oncoming traffic, but only if the right-turn exit is clear




















A mini-roundabout is normally found on a road with a speed limit of 30 mph or less. It should be treated the same as a conventional roundabout. You must give way to traffic from the right, and keep to the left of the white circle unless the size of your vehicle or the junction layout makes driving over it unavoidable



















Some conventional roundabouts may have a segregated left-turn lane where drivers do not give way to traffic on the roundabout. This may be separated from the roundabout by either a solid island or chevron markings. Where the chevrons are bounded by continuous lines, vehicles must not enter the area except in an emergency. You should therefore choose the correct lane well before the roundabout. A directional sign in advance of the junction may show the segregated lane


Traffic lanes at junctions



Appropriate traffic lanes for different movements at junction ahead. A double-headed arrow is used where two different movements may be made from the same lane or where that lane divides into two or more lanes ahead (e.g. a lane with a combined "left" and "ahead" arrow may divide into a left-turn lane and an ahead lane)


Compulsory traffic movements at a junction ahead. These may apply to a specific traffic lane or to all traffic approaching the junction Traffic Direction to be taken by traffic turning within a junction









Appropriate traffic lanes for particular destinations













Worded markings


Area of carriageway to be kept clear of stationary traffic, usually to allow the passage of vehicles into or out of a side road or access. The white bars may be omitted


Direction in which pedestrians should look before crossing the road (particularly in a one-way street or where there is a bus lane)



Vehicles must not pass this marking. May be used with the upright "no entry" sign Associated with a hazard. There will normally be an upright warning sign


Reflecting road studs




Coloured road studs help drivers at night, especially on wet roads, or in poor visibility. White studs mark traffic lanes or the centre of the road. The left-hand side of the carriageway is marked by red studs, and the edge of the central reservation of a motorway or dual carriageway road by amber studs. Green studs are used to mark lay-bys and the entrances to, and exits from,slip roads.


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